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Peregrine Vision

Hoping to see farther every day. Illustration, books, comics and general nerdiness.

Posts tagged things i am forced to think about:

minimoonstar:

To balance it out, my next one will be about how Hannibal Lecter is sort of like vampire genre fiction in that it’s this half-wallowing half-satirical class fantasy about feudal bloodsuckers. (As I’ve mentioned before, I learnt shallow Marxist exegesis at the age some people learn shallow…

Oh my God, my Damien-Hirst-related feelings about most of Hannibal esp. the Bev display, let me show you them. I think that scene was when I finally twigged that someone (not necessarily Brian Fuller?) might be having a go at the smugness of what mass media portrays as ‘high culture.’ (Cannibalism: it’s not for you.) The idea of serial killing as high art isn’t new, but in this series the delight I take in the tableaus as production design is balanced by the uncanny way they manage to capture that sense of walking into a particularly confrontational contemporary exhibition. I feel like ‘well obviously a true intellectual would immediately love this, and I have the relevant education, but I’m honestly just a little grossed out and unhappy right now.’

My only conclusion here is that despite many efforts I still enjoy production design (and most work in that direction) more than contemporary art. Most of my feelings and opinions on this much better expressed here.

The Organization for Transformative Works was founded six years ago, because fans realized that owning the means of circulating and distributing fanworks—the servers, the interface, the code, the terms of service—would be essential to the long-term health of fan creativity, and so we created the nonprofit, donor-supported Archive of Our Own. Today, when I talk about the importance of fan writing, I don’t just mean fiction and nonfiction: I mean contracts and code. In the old days, fans self-published their fiction (and put it under copyright, asserting their ownership in their words), they distributed their own VHS cassettes and digital downloads, and they coded and built their own websites and created their own terms of service. Today, enormous commercial entities—YouTube, Amazon, LiveJournal, Wattpad, Tumblr—own much of this infrastructure.

This is a very mixed bag. On the one hand, these companies’ products and interfaces have made it infinitely easier for the average fan to connect with other fans and distribute fanworks. Now you only need a username and a password to get started, where before you needed access to server space, a knowledge of HTML, how to use FTP, and so on. However, there are also various dangers, including not only capricious or exploitative terms of service but simple market failure. None of the companies I just listed has anything like the track record of the average fandom or fannish institution; consider how much younger they are than Sherlock Holmes, Doctor Who, or even Supernatural fandom. In the best case, these companies may fail and become a disruptive force in relatively stable and long-term communities; in the worst case, they may exploit and betray their users.

In the past few years, the nature of the arguments I have been having as a fandom advocate has changed: In the past, I found myself arguing for the legitimacy of our works; now, I find myself arguing against their exploitation. The commercial ownership of the infrastructure means that money has now complicated fandom’s gift culture, and, like it or not, we now have to think about who should benefit. Here, too, there is a spectrum: Some grassroots creators don’t want to engage with the commercial world on any terms (and they should have the right not to); others feel that if someone is profiting from their works, it should be them, and it should be a fair compensation. If the relationship between fans and the commercial world is being renegotiated, we’re going to have to apply some of our creative energies to writing contracts as well as fanfiction, rather than let unfavorable or disrespectful terms of authorship be handed down to us by corporate owners.

Francesca Coppa, in Participations: Dialogues on the Participatory Promise of Contemporary Culture and Politics (via fanculturesfancreativity)

This. This is the new battle line, and large sections of fandom and fan studies have been swept right over it without even realizing there’s something to contest.

(via cathexys)

#Supernatural is older than Tumblr

(via minimoonstar)

(via minimoonstar)

hotcityblues:

peaceshannon:

angry-hippo:

socialismartnature:

The food you eat or brush you’re using may have been made by a worker earning less than a dollar an hour — not in the developing world, but in the invisible workforce inside America’s prisons. Share this if you oppose prison labor for profit.  Source: http://ow.ly/iwTlY

When I was in prison I worked 3 shifts a day, 5 days a week, starting at 5 AM and ending at 8 PM. I was paid $5.25 a month. Pay for the inmates who facilitate UNICOR workers (by making their food, washing their laundry, etc,) is even lower than the wages cited in the above graphics. The prison industry is also a slave industry, and it isn’t just corporations who benefit. All the furniture you see in federal buildings, post offices, DMVs, etc, where do you think it comes from? Prison labor. I think a lot of people know about states that use prison labor for license plates, but fewer people know that the plaques on doors at city halls, and sometimes the doors themselves, come from prison labor. The incarcerated are a hyper-exploited class unto themselves, and almost no one seems to be helping them to organize.

this is sickening, especially when you consider the disproportionate rates of arrest and incarceration (and longer prison sentences) of poc in this country. disgusting.

As someone with parents who worked in the NYCS, I know for a fact that Corcraft (the furniture) as well as places like Lenscrafters “teach” people job skills by basically having them be free labor. There’s a lot of work that prisoners do as part of work release like the dairy/beef slaughterhouses or retired thoroughbred farms, but most of it is prison labor. I remember inmates “getting to be outside” by mowing all the state employee’s lawns, taking out our garbage, painting our houses, etc.
It was really weird.

hotcityblues:

peaceshannon:

angry-hippo:

socialismartnature:

The food you eat or brush you’re using may have been made by a worker earning less than a dollar an hour — not in the developing world, but in the invisible workforce inside America’s prisons. Share this if you oppose prison labor for profit.

Source: http://ow.ly/iwTlY

When I was in prison I worked 3 shifts a day, 5 days a week, starting at 5 AM and ending at 8 PM. I was paid $5.25 a month. Pay for the inmates who facilitate UNICOR workers (by making their food, washing their laundry, etc,) is even lower than the wages cited in the above graphics. The prison industry is also a slave industry, and it isn’t just corporations who benefit. All the furniture you see in federal buildings, post offices, DMVs, etc, where do you think it comes from? Prison labor. I think a lot of people know about states that use prison labor for license plates, but fewer people know that the plaques on doors at city halls, and sometimes the doors themselves, come from prison labor. The incarcerated are a hyper-exploited class unto themselves, and almost no one seems to be helping them to organize.

this is sickening, especially when you consider the disproportionate rates of arrest and incarceration (and longer prison sentences) of poc in this country. disgusting.

As someone with parents who worked in the NYCS, I know for a fact that Corcraft (the furniture) as well as places like Lenscrafters “teach” people job skills by basically having them be free labor. There’s a lot of work that prisoners do as part of work release like the dairy/beef slaughterhouses or retired thoroughbred farms, but most of it is prison labor. I remember inmates “getting to be outside” by mowing all the state employee’s lawns, taking out our garbage, painting our houses, etc.

It was really weird.

(via airyairyquitecontrary)

Just so you know you're a flawless creature and I love you and all of your artwork. I've just dropped out of art school, it really took all of my passion out of me. Do you have any suggestions as to how I can get my groove back? asked by cyrilvamp

littlefroggies:

My advice for losing passion or drive is kinda different than most my friends so take that with a grain of salt, but I can only say what’s worked for me: Make yourself work. Doesn’t matter what you’re working on, don’t let yourself sit around not doing anything. You don’t have to take on, like, your opus or anything… but you need to be doing something with your art. You need to make a project, and hold yourself accountable for finishing it. Even if it looks like trash or its a failed experiment, its okay to make bad stuff. You learn from making bad stuff. Just keep your hands busy, keep your brain busy.

If I waited for when I felt my “groove” or had passion for it, I’d probably be out of a job because there was a 3 month period not long ago when I was burnt out and tired of drawing/writing, but I had to cuz its my job. I did good work I was proud of, regardless of being in my groove. I just had to find a motivation that wasn’t passion for those 3 months… which turned out to be “fear of not getting paid” and “refusing to drop quality.”

I am not of the opinion people should only work when they feel inspired. Sometimes, you just have to do it. You have to sit down and work. You have to find a reason to keep going at it during the times when the passion isn’t there, cuz the passion will not always be there.

like I said, take my advise with a grain of salt. This is what’s worked for me and how I function.

genufa:

morgan-leigh:

relevant to my recent writings, I feel.

This describes the dynamic really accurately IMO

Forex RDJ’s always dealt with the vicissitudes of Marvel Hell by making Tony Stark show up in his stead, which, if I had to run this kind of red carpet gauntlet and that option were available, I would totally take it too?

But Chris Evans can’t even make Steve Rogers show up for him. Steve would hate it just as profoundly, there’s no escape.

now I’m wishing Johnny Storm would roll up and protect both of them behind the invincible shield of his ego.

(Source: alphalewolf)

2pathsdiverged:

babycakesbriauna:

walkingthenarrowway:

sapphrikah:

butwilltherebetea:

Rock Newman on The Phil Donahue Show sharing his experiences as a black man who has passed as white. 

Literally just said this the other day

Tell them again, because they act real hard of hearing when we explain this shit.

but they don’t hear u doeee.

Always reblog

They act real hard of hearing when this shit is explained

(Source: exgynocraticgrrl, via robaemea)

Many people object to “wasting money in space” yet have no idea how much is actually spent on space exploration. The CSA’s budget, for instance, is less than the amount Canadians spend on Halloween candy every year, and most of it goes toward things like developing telecommunications satellites and radar systems to provide data for weather and air quality forecasts, environmental monitoring and climate change studies. Similarly, NASA’s budget is not spent in space but right here on Earth, where it’s invested in American businesses and universities, and where it also pays dividends, creating new jobs, new technologies and even whole new industries.

Chris Hadfield, An Astronaut’s Guide to Life on Earth (via femscinerd)

(Source: thedragoninmygarage, via katzenfabrik)

invaderxan:

This is disturbing and it makes me sad. We need to fix this. Right, tumblr?

(via cherrybina)

I honestly don’t know why this bothers me so much right now but…

Putting a list of hot men on a Pinterest board called ‘Why God Made Us Women’ is calling on a whole host of assumptions that I am personally uncomfortable with, even more so because we are friends and you are a pretty kickass lady usually.

sunspotpony:

prettyinpixiedust:

So one day a dwarf is talking to a human and finally realizes that when humans say woman, they generally mean “person who is theoretically capable of childbirth” because for whatever reason, humans assign social expectations based genital differences….

Extra relevant because as a person who makes things and has defined herself so much by enforced gender norms, this kind of thinking is world-changing. 

Now I know what being liberated feels like; like being extremely happy and very angry at the same time

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